» » Creating a Chinese Harbin: Nationalism in an International City, 1916–1932
full-datePDF: 1372 kb | ePUB: 1882 kb | FB2: 1148 kb
Other

Creating a Chinese Harbin: Nationalism in an International City, 1916–1932 - James H. Carter

Creating a Chinese Harbin: Nationalism in an International City, 1916–1932

Author: James H. Carter
Book title: Creating a Chinese Harbin: Nationalism in an International City, 1916–1932
ISBN: 0801439663
ISBN13: 978-0801439667
Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (May 31, 2002)
Language: English
Category: Humanities
Rating: 4.9/5
Votes: 571
Pages: 232 pages
More formats: azw mobi lit rtf

James H. Carter outlines the birth of Chinese nationalism in an unlikely setting: the international city of Harbin. Planned and built by Russian railway engineers, the city rose quickly from the Manchurian plain, changing from a small fishing village to a modern city in less than a generation. Russian, Chinese, Korean, Polish, Jewish, French, and British residents filled this multiethnic city on the Sungari River. The Chinese took over Harbin after the October Revolution and ruled it from 1918 until the Japanese founded the puppet state of Manchukuo in 1932. In his account of the radical changes that this unique city experienced over a brief span of time, Carter examines the majority Chinese population and its developing Chinese identity in an urban area of fifty languages. Originally, Carter argues, its nascent nationalism defined itself against the foreign presence in the city―while using foreign resources to modernize the area. Early versions of Chinese nationalism embraced both nation and state. By the late 1920s, the two strands had separated to such an extent that Chinese police fired on Chinese student protesters. This division eased the way for Japanese occupation: the Chinese state structure proved a fruitful source of administrative collaboration for the area's new rulers in the 1930s.
Reviews: (3)
Ance
I haven't read the entire volume yet, though what I have read I find fascinating. The details of how Harbin grew in fits and starts, until the coming of the Japanese invasion. Why am I interested in this book? Simple. I was born in Harbin and my parents and grandparents lived there during and after the time described in the book. I wanted to know what they encountered and the hardships they endured. My grandfather was a famous Russian Orthodox priest and my father somehow managed to work for both the Chinese and Japanese in Harbin. He was an adroit adapter to the prevailing power structure. That's how we survived and finally got to the USA. But that's another story, and my book about to be written. There are other books about Harbin, most of which I have or will acquire. This is a good one and I recommend it.
spark
BORN IN HARBIN IN 1926, WHEN IT WAS STILL "A RUSSIAN CITY" BRINGS SO MANY MEMORIIS OF JOYFUL LIFE TO LOSS OF EVERYTING AS HARBIN CHANGEN HANDS FROM THE WHITE RUSSIAN EMMIGRANTS TO THE COMMUNIST TAKE OVER. THIS IS A MUST READ AS AN EXAMPLE OF HOW PEOPLE SUIRVICE CHANGES AND FIND WAY TO DO SO RELYING ON THEIR OWN RESOURCES.
Tygrafym
I was hoping to read more about "Russian" Harbin as background for creating a Chinese Harbin.
2019 © ebokPDF.com
All rights reserved.